Seattle Yoga News is on a mission to find and highlight all of the hidden, and maybe not so hidden, gems in our yoga community and beyond. We want you to learn about their experiences and perspectives, but also a bit more about their personalities, so we have a few fun questions for them. This week’s spotlight is turned towards Casey Hubbell.

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED WITH YOGA?

Casey Hubbell

Casey Hubbell:

I began practicing yoga in college at UNT in Denton, TX in 2000. The teacher rented out a martial arts studio and offered a few classes a week. During a season of my life filled with so much uncertainty and fear, yoga grounded me. I learned how to listen to myself, how to trust myself, and that I was my own authority. 

WHAT KIND OF TRAININGS HAVE YOU PURSUED?

Casey Hubbell

Casey Hubbell:

My first 200hr TT was Anusara-based led by Silvia Mordini hosted at Haute Yoga Queen Anne with Jenniferlyn Chiemingo and Leah Zaccaria supporting the training. I also completed CorePower Yoga’s 200hr TT in 2012 led by Sarah Goble. Although very different in styles, I am grateful for the huge impact these female teachers, leaders and entrepreneurs had on me. Additional trainings include Next Generation Yoga’s 2-7yo led by Nicole Koleshis (now doing amazing work at Seattle Kids Yoga)  and Street Yoga’s Trauma-Informed training. 

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR TEACHING METHOD?

Casey Hubbell

Casey Hubbell:

Whether teaching a beginner series, restorative or vinyasa class, I am intentional and thoughtful. Choice and consent are at the heart of my classes. I teach yoga of discernment, encouraging students to make choices that are right for them in that moment.

WHAT’S THE BEST PIECE OF ADVICE YOU HAVE EVER RECEIVED?

Casey Hubbell

Casey Hubbell:

I’m not sure about “ever received” but my 6yo son gave me a zinger recently.
I had about ten minutes before my daughter’s preschool pick-up and just needed a couple things from the grocery store across the street. It’s so much easier running an errand with one child compared to two and I was wanting to cross this off my list. We headed into the store and my son started putting his face in all of the flower bouquets near the entrance. I urged him to “c’mon” because we didn’t have much time. He responded, “Mom, I just want to stop and smell the flowers.” I laughed at the irony. Me, with my to-do list, need for efficiency and awareness of logistics like time. My 6yo, just enjoying the moment. Touché, universe. 

WHAT DOES YOUR PERSONAL PRACTICE LOOK LIKE?

Casey Hubbell

Casey Hubbell:

Currently, my personal practice is mostly at home and intermittent. I start my day with a little breathing and meditation, sometimes one minute, sometimes ten. I recruit my kids to join in a few rounds of Sun Salutations. Usually they’re only willing if I play Dance for the Sun by Kira Willey. In the afternoon, I squeeze in more active or challenging asana or movement. It’s a lovely day when I prioritize meditation or gentle yoga before bed.

CAN YOU TELL US WHAT ONE CAN EXPECT WHEN VISITING YOGA WILD & WHAT MAKES IT DIFFERENT FROM OTHER STUDIOS IN SEATTLE?

Casey Hubbell

Casey Hubbell:

It depends where you find us. 😉 We spent our first year nomadic, teaching in nature and community spaces. Last spring, we opened a studio in Court House Sq in downtown Tacoma. Our space used to be a storage closet and we’ve converted it into a 20-mat studio. No mirrors or music. Just a simple, lovely, minimalist space. If you visit us in the summer, we can be found on rooftops or by the water. Bring layers and be willing to get a little dirty. We’re a gritty bunch in a gritty city.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE THAT YOU HAVE FACED AS A YOGA TEACHER & STUDIO CO-OWNER? AND WHAT ADVICE CAN YOU GIVE FOR YOGA TEACHERS CONSIDERING OPENING A YOGA STUDIO?

Casey Hubbell

Casey Hubbell:

The challenge that comes to mind is financials. When we started Yoga Wild, my business partner and I wanted to keep overhead as low as possible to keep classes more affordable. We are self-funded and keep our operational costs low. After we opened our studio, it was initially a clean blank space. Thanks to Business Impact NW’s annual Impact Pitch competition, we won a $10k small business operational grant. We were able to purchase bolsters and blankets to expand our offerings.
Your business doesn’t have to be perfect or 100% complete to get going. Just get going. We created a community first before we opened a brick and mortar. And now, Yoga Wild students feel invested in our growth. We started with a bin of mats and now we have a studio and 20 people on our team.

WHAT YOGA RELATED BOOKS HAVE MOST INFLUENCED YOU?

WHAT IS ONE THING MOST PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT YOU?

Casey Hubbell

Casey Hubbell:

I grew up in a baseball family. My grandfather played in the minor leagues and my great-uncle is in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Carl Hubbell was a two-time National League MVP and known for his screwball. I even got my name from the old baseball poem Casey at the Bat.

WHO IS THE YOGI WE SHOULD FEATURE NEXT AND WHY?

Casey Hubbell

Casey Hubbell:

Hien Hong is a yoga teacher in Tacoma doing impactful work. She teaches from a trauma-informed lens and encourages self-compassion over perfection. She is committed to making yoga and meditation accessible to all and leads donation-based classes for womxn of color. She is currently training with Susanna Barkataki.

Casey Hubbell’s Bio: Casey, E-RYT 200, is co-founder and Director of Yoga and Community Engagement of Yoga Wild. She is either teaching, taking care of #TeamYW, or setting up classes and series. Casey is passionate about bringing yoga into places that need it most, offering inclusive classes and styles, and encourages students to practice yoga of discernment. Fun facts: she is a Potterhead and bibliophile. Prounouns: she/her.


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